Coach Alicia Fong

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Health tip for week Feb 22nd

  • Quad stretch is important for most American people because we sit for long hours at work, in our cars due to long commutes and at home watching TV for hours.

People who are siting for long hours are likely to have lower-crossed syndrome.  Lower-crossed syndrome are people who have anterior pelvic tilt (hips tilted forward), increased lumber (low back) lordosis (curve) and increase hip flexion.  Lower-crossed syndrome is a postural distortion syndrome affecting the lower kinetic chain (lumbopelvic hip complex, knee, and ankle).  Having a swayback (excessive curve of the lower back) or head forward posture is a good indication of lower-crossed syndrome.

Lower-crossed Syndrome is not good because this can cause tightness and hyperactivity in the hip flexor group (iliopsoas etc.) which weakens certain muscles around the area.  The tight muscles are generally are hip flexors (such as iliopsoas, rectus femoris – one of the quadricep muscles), and erector spinae muscle group – the muscles on either side of the spine.  The weakened muscles are abdominal muscles and gluteus maximus – part of your buttock muscles.  This imbalance then produces a secondary effect during walking.  Since these people are unable to produce hip flexion with the gluteus maximus, they begin to substitute the low back extensors, and sometimes resulting in lower back pains.

Therefore, stretching your quads will elongate and reduce the tightness in the rectus femoris (a large quadricep muscle) and correct the postural distortion.  In most cases, altering the pelvis tilt can eliminate this lower-crossed syndrome and upper-crossed syndrome which work in hand-in-hand.

I like to stretch the quadricep muscle by using a swiss ball so people won’t compensate through their back and at the same time activates your glute muscles.  Watch the following video for detailed instructions:

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February 23, 2010 - Posted by | Uncategorized | , , ,

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